Monthly Archives: February 2017

Microsoft Internet Explorer Pushes Beyond Second Screen To Companion Web

“We’re at a tipping point with connected devices,” a recent blog post from Microsoft Microsoft‘s Internet Explorer team reads. “Every day, 3.6 million mobile devices and tablets are activated worldwide. That’s over five times more than the number of babies born each day!” They’ve got a point, but it is a sad irony for Microsoft that so few of those mobile devices run their software.

But Microsoft has sold more than 70 million Xbox 360s and has a very TV-centric followup, the Xbox One, coming in November. As Forbes.com contributor Tristan Louis points out in today’s post on Smarter TVs, ”the upcoming battle for the living room is a chance to redeem itself and turn its fortune around.” The parody video that Louis refers to shows all of the instances of the words “TV,” “television,” “sports” and “Call of Duty” in the launch announcement. Although the announcement raised the ire of hard core gamers, the emphasis on TV (and perhaps the two things TVs are most used for, watching sports and playing Call of Duty) must have been highly intentional.

Games have been Microsoft’s route into the living room, but that strong association is now an impediment to its more generalized assault of the living room. Non-gamers are probably thinking more about the future AppleApple TV than about the Xbox as their upgrade path to interactive TV. In response to this perception, Microsoft has launched a new program called “Companion Web.” The idea is to facilitate real time interactions between different devices. And because Microsoft has no footprint to speak of in the world of mobile, they are now trying to emerge as a unifying force between iOS and Android.

The problem Microsoft is trying to solve (other than the risk of their own irrelevance) is that “the majority of sites on the web are built for only one device at a time.” The user can search for related information to what they are watching on their TV, for instance, but real time it ain’t. And content owners can make second screen experiences, but they have tended to be operating system (and sometimes even device) specific. Microsoft is after a more generalized solution that does not impose an unmanageable burden on developers.

“Regardless of who makes the device or software that powers the device, the Companion Web enables the internet to bridge the gap between these devices,” the IE blog post reads. “For developers, Companion Web represents an opportunity to reuse code that works across multiple scenarios, enabling greater reach and ways to engage an audience. For consumers, Companion Web means you’ll seamlessly move from one device to the next, interacting with your photos, videos, music, movies, television shows, files, and more.”

Companion Web would seem to be a more generalized version of the Xbox SmartGlass, which also allowed you to interact with your TV via Windows devices and select iOS and Android devices, but only on very specific games and content. The promise of the Companion Web is of a much broader range of experiences that the user could have between devices.

So far, Microsoft has released three such “Companion Web experiences” working with outside developers. I became aware of the program through Luke Wroblewski who has created a version of his Polar app that works in this companion manner with Internet Explorer. As you can see in the video below, Polar uses IE’s snap mode to assign a “sidebar” portion of the screen (in this case a Surface tablet acts a s a proxy for a Windows 8/Xbox One enabled TV) to itself while the user uses the balance of the screen to watch Futurama.

Wroblewski demonstrates the ways that you can find polls with Polar about Futurama and watch the results update in real time while you are watching the show. You can imagine something like this being a lot of fun for big live TV events like the Oscars or the Super Bowl, where the amount of real time activity would be high and seeing how other people are reacting becomes part of the entertainment. Similarly, you can make up your own hashtags for polls in Polar so that the reactions you are monitoring are only a select group of people. Either way, mass or niche, the real time linkage with the content on the big screen really extends the idea of the Polar app by making these interactions available to a room full of people—each potentially interacting with their own mobile devices.

And, important to note (since this is IE, after all, that we are talking about) that this all uses standard open web technology. Specifically, Wroblewski tells me, Companion Web uses web sockets to create the real time connections between devices. He says, “you can make a connection between pretty much any two ‘modern’ Web browsers regardless of device.” One of the other really interesting things about the Polar demonstration is that, as I described in a recent post, it uses a multi-device web page that enables all kinds of input (touch, mouse and keyboard) depending on device. And in the Companion Web experience, all all of these inputs can be used to control the connected screen.

What the other “modern” browsers don’t have that Internet Explorer 10 has is this snap mode. If there was one thing that iOS 7 should have copied from Windows (instead of all that flatness stuff) it would have been snap mode. So these Companion Web experiences will work across virtually all devices (because they use standard web tech) but the Xbox One will retain an advantage of being the only way to uses these “companions” on the screen simultaneously with other activities. And Polar, I think, has shown how this could become a really powerful feature.

The other two Companion Web experiments released so far do not make use of this snap mode feature. DailyBurn, see video below, uses a smartphone or tablet to get real time data related to workouts you view on your TV. This app is clearly trying to appeal to users who may need some constructive excuse to get an Xbox One.

Mix Party, introduced in the (purposely?) obnoxious video below, allows people at a party to create real time, collaborative playlists with their phones. As with Polar, the real time aspect of this is part of the entertainment value. I’m not sure if DailyBurn is intended as a solo experience or if multiple people could monitor their own individual performance of a shared video workout or not, but Mix Party and Polar clearly have real time, fact to face interactions in mind.

What is interesting to me about this strategy is that there are some extra capabilities that Microsoft has built into IE 10/Xbox One (and likely will build more) that will give it an advantage as an app enabled web TV platform, but the apps developers write will also work well on all devices. This strategy of “progressive enhancement” is a comfortable one to developers because it keeps their options open. Allowing for these entropic possibilities is a smart way to get developers on board, which, in turn, could be the means to Microsoft’s resurgence through the big screen.

Facebook offers the dummy’s guide to mobile advertising

Facebook Inc’s mobile advertising success offers a ray of hope for Internet companies trying to make money within the confines of the smartphone’s small screen.

The social network’s 75 percent surge in mobile ad revenue in a span of just three months not only doused skepticism on Wall Street and Madison Avenue about Facebook’s business prospects, some say it could serve as a how-to guide for other Web companies navigating a world where the phone and tablet have fast become the screens of choice.

Facebook’s “Newsfeed” ads, which inject marketing messages straight into a user’s content stream and are tailored for mobile devices, were the stars behind the social network’s stunning numbers on Wednesday.

“You’re going to see a lot of companies transitioning and trying to emulate this model because it’s working so well. That’s why last night was a true watershed moment,” said Ben Schachter, an analyst at Macquarie Research.

Internet company executives have long been concerned that mobile advertising is inherently less lucrative than traditional desktop PC advertising, due to the smartphone’s limited screen size and possible consumer resistance to a flood of ads on their devices.

Companies from Google Inc and Yahoo Inc to upstarts such as Snapchat are searching for the right formula to monetize mobile services. While Google has developed a mobile ad business generating an estimated $10 billion a year in revenue, it remains much smaller and less lucrative than Google’s desktop search advertising. Analysts expect Google to generate $60 billion in annual revenue this year.

That wholesale exploration of “native ads” – or marketing messages intended to blend with a users’ personal content, rather than stand out as an ad – has met with varying success.

Twitter, which pioneered the concept of the in-stream ad even before Facebook, may also be well-positioned to benefit from mobile ads. “Sponsored” messages now pop up abruptly in the middle of streams of tweets, but analysts say the frequency is much lower on Facebook newsfeeds.

More than half of the privately held company’s revenue will come from mobile ads this year, reckons Clark Fredricksen, at industry research firm eMarketer.

Some are just getting into the game. This week, LinkedIn Corp, the network for business professionals, rolled out in-stream ads on mobile and PC versions of its service. Yahoo has experimented with similar types of ads, and acquired blogging hub Tumblr for $1.1 billion in May, in part to jumpstart efforts at developing new formats.

But it’s Facebook, which a year ago had zero mobile revenue, that has most aggressively promoted its mobile advertising business to Madison Avenue – with seeming success.

“Compared to other companies, nobody has come right out and said mobile is our sole focus now,” said Angela Steele, CEO of Ansible, part of advertising holding company IPG. “Facebook put all their eggs in one basket.”

FOLLOWING SUIT

One longstanding question has been how much tolerance consumers have for ads that disrupt their stream of content. Facebook said it has steadily increased the number of ads in the news stream without noticing a drop in user satisfaction.

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said on Wednesday that, on average, ads now account for 5 percent or one in 20 “stories” in the newsfeed. That ratio could now provide a baseline for calculating success, prompting other Web companies to raise the frequency of ads in their streams.

“It wouldn’t surprise me if other companies would look at that and follow suit,” said Ansible’s Steele.

Hussein Fazal, the CEO of AdParlor, which manages advertising campaigns on Facebook, guesses that the social network must have gradually opened the spigot, gauging user reaction and adjusting the stream all the while.

They seemed to have hit on the right formula, but it’s one that differs across platforms, he said.

“The reason Facebook can do it is, the rest of the content that’s there is so engaging that you don’t mind one out of every 20 ads,” he said. “If you have a newsfeed that’s not so engaging, and you keep seeing ads, then it doesn’t work.”

Plus, the more ads in the stream, the less users will click on them, which can dampen ad prices, he added.

Facebook’s seeming success on mobile devices contrasts with Google’s more gradual improvement in that area. The No. 1 Internet search engine has gradually managed to narrow declines in its overall ad rates from the mobile effect, but last quarter they reversed and went down again, disappointing investors.

Google has avoided news stream ads entirely in its Google+ social network. Instead, its mix of mobile search ads, video ads and innovative formats such as “click-to-call” have delivered what RBC Capital Markets analyst Mark Mahaney estimates is a $10 billion annualized run rate for its mobile business, about four times as much as Facebook.

But mobile has driven down the average cost of Google ads, and some industry watchers consider the transition a long-term threat to the search giant. But other analysts say recent changes to the way it sells ads to marketers, blurring the distinction between the mobile and PC, could help bolster rates.

Video ad AMD Graphics Card Criticize Nvidia

Not only the mobile gadget manufacturers who likes sarcastic competitors through advertising, this trend also extends to the world of PC components. One example is a video advertisement for AMD graphics card product called “AMD Radeon Graphics Presents: The Fixer”.

It is said, a gamer complaining because the graphics card “brand X” is not capable of running the game his liking. Then comes the one who suggested the players that switch using AMD graphics cards. Here’s The Fixer, a figure in the story that will “fix” the problem gamers.

The Fixer suggestion was inserted various promotional messages. For example, there is mention of a given game bundle through series AMD Radeon graphics card is used on the Xbox console and the PlayStation 4 One. There are also allusions to the gait of the graphics card manufacturer AMD competitor in the mobile world.

Ad ends with a scene of two men walked into the yard. Belonged to the old graphics card gamer-that design is similar to one graphics card Nvidia GeForce-looked is held by The Fixer and slammed to the ground and destroyed with cruel.

Poor graphics card manufacturer’s logo is obfuscated in the video. Are still clearly visible is the color, the light green is synonymous with Nvidia GeForce.

Looks a little scared by the brutal actions that occurred in front of him, the players shouted, “You need to calm down!” are answered by The Fixer, “I never compromise (settle)”. The word “settle” here does have two meanings, namely “calm” and “compromise”. Meanwhile, “Never Settle” is the name of the game promo bundle on AMD graphics cards.

He might look a bit stiff and childish, this ad still worth a look with a cool head. Consumers in the end it will benefit from the competition between industry players.

ASUS PQ321Q UltraHD Monitor Review: Living with a 31.5-inch 4K Desktop Display

Many consider me to be a 4K hater. The past few trade shows I’ve attended have been pushing it on consumers to replace their TVs, but I see less value in it. When it comes to a computer display, it is a different game. Unlike a 50” TV, we sit close to our monitors, even if they are 30” in size. We also have no worries about a lack of native content, since everything is rendered on the fly and native. There are no issues with the lack of HDMI 2.0, as DisplayPort 1.2 can drive a 3840×2160 screen at 60 Hz.

When it comes to 4K on the desktop, my main question is: how much difference will I see? ASUS is one of the first with a HiDPI display in the PQ321Q. While not truly 4K, it is a 3840×2160 LCD display that can accept an Ultra High Definition (UHD) signal over HDMI and DisplayPort. It also clocks in at a wallet-stretching $3,500 right now. The question is, are we seeing the future with displays here, or are we seeing a niche product?

What does 4K/UHD/HiDPI bring to the desktop? We’ve seen it for a few years now in smartphones and tablets, making their smaller screens more usable for reading and general work. My initial thought is more desktop space, as that is what it has meant before. With a 32” monitor and a pixel density this high, running it without any DPI scaling leads to a desktop where reading text is a huge pain. Instead I believe most users will opt for DPI scaling so elements are larger and easier to read. Now you have something similar to the Retina screen on the iPhone: No more desktop space compared to a 2560×1440 monitor, but one that is razor sharp and easier to look at.

To get to this pixel density, ASUS has relied upon a panel from Sharp that uses IGZO technology. IGZO (Indium gallium zinc oxide) is a material that replaces amorphous silicon for the active layer of an LCD screen. The main benefit is higher electron mobility that allows for faster reacting, smaller pixels. We have seen non-IGZO panels in smartphones with higher pixel densities, but we don’t have any other current desktop LCDs that offer a higher pixel density than this ASUS display. IGZO also allows for a wide viewing angle.

Safari and Chrome Still Leads Mobile Web Browser

Jakarta – Around 80 percent of the world population has a mobile phone. The number of mobile phones around the world estimated to be about 5 billion units, with 1.08 billion units of which include smart phones. Thus, it’s no wonder when browsing on the Internet today is mostly done through mobile phones.

Most of the smart phone owners, as quoted from the go-globe.com, prefer to use a standard mobile web browser, aka the phones default browser. They reason, the default web browser is definitely the best for their phones.

There is also the thought that they do not need to change the web browser because it did not want to be bothered by trivial matters, such as the need to download first and then run the application.

Another reason put forward is that they feel no need to update the web browse, as is done on a notebook or desktop computer. Therefore, updating the application is much more important than replacing the web browser on the mobile device.

For desktop and notebook computers, the web browser is the most widely used Google Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, and Safari. Competition to be the most popular frequently occur between Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Google Chrome.

In mobile devices, such as smart mobile phones and tablet computers, maps of different strength. Which became the market share leader for the mobile web browser is Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome browser fib.

However, in recent months, Safari increasingly dominant. According to the output data from Net Applications, Safari controlled 61.79 percent market share for web traffic in March. In fact, months before Apple’s browser only won 55.41 percent market share.

In general, mobile web browsers can be distinguished from ability, such as opening a different site, doing page zoom, and make a keyboard shortcut. However, there is also an optimal mobile web browsers on mobile devices use only.

In addition, there are several mobile devices also can not offer a lot of choice what mobile web browsers can be used. One of the devices is a flexible mobile devices with Windows Mobile operating system.

In Indonesia, people always want a high-speed mobile web browser.

“We provide the connectivity features with high compression, especially on a busy network. Compression is also advantageous because the users were able to save the battery, “said Communications Manager Opera Indonesia, Agnes Agastia, two weeks ago.

No less aggressive in offering the experience of using a mobile web browser is Google. According to Google’s Head of Communications Indonesia Vishnu K. Mahmud, Google will continue to focus on developing a modern browser Chrome that will provide the best experience for its users.

Mobile web browser is best for your device, of course depending on the need and type of device used. Therefore, not all mobile devices compatible with the existing web browser.

Mozilla Releases Firefox 22 with Support 3D Game, Video Call, and File Sharing

Mozilla has just released Firefox 22 browser with integrated support for 3D gaming, video calls, and file sharing. Thus, application developers can create applications that can run in the browser without the need to use third party plugins.
Firefox has aged 15 years, and according to vice president of Firefox Engineering, Johnathan Nightingale, the browser has changed in terms of how people use it. Browser applications have been the key to connect to the internet and used to locate information and software, and therefore the present browser must be built for the needs of people and how they use them more quickly.
Firefox 22 to wear a subset of JavaScript called asm.js through OdinMonkey to run 3D applications and processors directly from web.Untuk chat foro, Firefox 22 is added Web Real-Time Communications (WebRTC), which can be used both video calling application developers from PC or mobile browser. Mozilla has been expressed at the MWC in 2013 and this technology can be integrated seamlessly with mobile phones so that users can make voice calls and file sharing file. In addition to Firefox, Google also integrate it in the Chrome browser since October 2012 last year. One service that supports WebRTC is Tokbox.
To highlight the potential of this feature, Mozilla has made ​​a 3D game called BananaBread. This game utilizing WebRTC, asm.js, WebGL, and Emscripten.
via The Next Web

Parallel and Concurrent Programming in Haskell

As one of the developers of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC) for almost 15 years, I have seen Haskell grow from a niche research language into a rich and thriving ecosystem. I spent a lot of that time working on GHC’s support for parallelism and concurrency. One of the first things I did to GHC in 1997 was to rewrite its runtime system, and a key decision we made at that time was to build concurrency right into the core of the system rather than making it an optional extra or an add-on library. I like to think this decision was founded upon shrewd foresight, but in reality it had as much to do with the fact that we found a way to reduce the overhead of concurrency to near zero (previously it had been on the order of 2%; we’ve always been performance-obsessed). Nevertheless, having concurrency be non-optional meant that it was always a first-class part of the implementation, and I’m sure that this decision was instrumental in bringing about GHC’s solid and lightning-fast concurrency support.

Haskell has a long tradition of being associated with parallelism. To name just a few of the projects, there was the pH variant of Haskell derived from the Id language, which was designed for parallelism, the GUM system for running parallel Haskell programs on multiple machines in a cluster, and the GRiP system: a complete computer architecture designed for running parallel functional programs. All of these happened well before the current multicore revolution, and the problem was that this was the time when Moore’s law was still giving us ever-faster computers. Parallelism was difficult to achieve, and didn’t seem worth the effort when ordinary computers were getting exponentially faster.

Around 2004, we decided to build a parallel implementation of the GHC runtime system for running on shared memory multiprocessors, something that had not been done before. This was just before the multicore revolution. Multiprocessor machines were fairly common, but multicores were still around the corner. Again, I’d like to think the decision to tackle parallelism at this point was enlightened foresight, but it had more to do with the fact that building a shared-memory parallel implementation was an interesting research problem and sounded like fun. Haskell’s purity was essential—it meant that we could avoid some of the overheads of locking in the runtime system and garbage collector, which in turn meant that we could reduce the overhead of using parallelism to a low-single-digit percentage. Nevertheless, it took more research, a rewrite of the scheduler, and a new parallel garbage collector before the implementation was really usable and able to speed up a wide range of programs. The paper I presented at the International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP) in 2009 marked the turning point from an interesting prototype into a usable tool.

All of this research and implementation was great fun, but good-quality resources for teaching programmers how to use parallelism and concurrency in Haskell were conspicuously absent. Over the last couple of years, I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to teach two summer school courses on parallel and concurrent programming in Haskell: one at the Central European Functional Programming (CEFP) 2011 summer school in Budapest, and the other the CEA/EDF/INRIA 2012 Summer School at Cadarache in the south of France. In preparing the materials for these courses, I had an excuse to write some in-depth tutorial matter for the first time, and to start collecting good illustrative examples. After the 2012 summer school I had about 100 pages of tutorial, and thanks to prodding from one or two people (see the Acknowledgments), I decided to turn it into a book. At the time, I thought I was about 50% done, but in fact it was probably closer to 25%. There’s a lot to say! I hope you enjoy the results.

Audience

You will need a working knowledge of Haskell, which is not covered in this book. For that, a good place to start is an introductory book such as Real World Haskell (O’Reilly), Programming in Haskell (Cambridge University Press), Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! (No Starch Press), or Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming (Addison-Wesley).

How to Read This Book

The main goal of the book is to get you programming competently with Parallel and Concurrent Haskell. However, as you probably know by now, learning about programming is not something you can do by reading a book alone. This is why the book is deliberately practical: There are lots of examples that you can run, play with, and extend. Some of the chapters have suggestions for exercises you can try out to get familiar with the topics covered in that chapter, and I strongly recommend that you either try a few of these, or code up some of your own ideas.

As we explore the topics in the book, I won’t shy away from pointing out pitfalls and parts of the system that aren’t perfect. Haskell has been evolving for over 20 years but is moving faster today than at any point in the past. So we’ll encounter inconsistencies and parts that are less polished than others. Some of the topics covered by the book are very recent developments: Chapters 4, 5, 6, and pass:[14 cover frameworks that were developed in the last few years.

The book consists of two mostly independent parts: Part I and Part II. You should feel free to start with either part, or to flip between them (i.e., read them concurrently!). There is only one dependency between the two parts: Chapter 13 will make more sense if you have read Part I first, and in particular before reading “The ParIO monad”, you should have read Chapter 4.

While the two parts are mostly independent from each other, the chapters should be read sequentially within each part. This isn’t a reference book; it contains running examples and themes that are developed across multiple chapters.

Monoprice 27″ IPS-G Pro LED Monitor WQHD 2560×1440

Monoprice is among the more interesting companies you probably haven’t heard of. Started out of an apartment around a decade ago, the company initially sold everything at a single price, hence the name. That business model may have worked when the product line was mostly cables and connectors, but the company now offers a diverse array that includes monitors (more in a moment), home theatre screens, graphics tablets, headphones, apocket-size pico projector, an action cam, even electric guitars – and, yes, cables, connectors and accessories as well. It’s a lineup with no seeming rhyme or reason, other than quality products at bargain prices.

And that actually is the rhyme and reason behind Monoprice products. According to CEO Ajay Kumar, the company looks for categories where vastly overpriced products predominate. That gives Monoprice room to create and sell products at dramatically lower price points, while still maintaining strong profit margins.
“We are in the right place at the right time with our business model,” says Kumar, who joined the company in July 2011. “We offer the same cable or accessory as national retail brands, but for much less cost. However, we are not cutting corners as we employ high-quality manufacturing partners who work with our specs. Our markup is much lower and we pass those savings to our customers. Monoprice brings them a value proposition they can’t find anywhere else.”
And that leads us to the Monoprice 27″ IPS-G Pro LED Monitor WQHD 2560×1440 Product ID 10489, which is what you came here for. I’ve been rocking this 16:9 (widescreen) monitor for over a month now and it’s stunning. Let’s take a look at the stats and find out why.
Start with the size, 27″. You don’t have to join Grindr to know that size matters. A larger screen means that you can work easily with more windows at once. It makes copying files and editing text and spreadsheets easier and obviously makes working with pictures and video more convenient, if that’s your thing. And if you’re a gamer, a large screen is essential. Ditto if you are, for instance, a daytrader or a designer.
Hand in glove with size is resolution. “WQHD” may sound like a Minneapolis TV station, but it means 2560 x 1440 pixels. Some 27″ screens max out at regular Full HD, which is 1920 x 1080. The higher resolution of the Monoprice unit means that more detail is visible, if your PC’s graphics card supports it. If not, you’ll be limited to 1920 x 1080 (or less, if your PC is really old). A large screen with high resolution allows you to display more information. It makes it easier to do more with your PC.
Since we’re talking graphics cards, another nice feature of the Monoprice 10489 is that it supports four different types of interface: HDMI 1.4, DVI, VGA and DisplayPort 1.2. That means that the monitor is bound to work with your existing graphics card. The package includes VGA and DVI-D cables, but these are standard length (around 6′). Because of the size of the monitor, it’s much easier to use longer cables – you can plug in the cable before maneuvering the monitor into place on your desk. Monoprice has you covered with available 15′ HDMI, DVI-D, VGA and DisplayPort 1.2 cables. Choose the one you need.
The monitor uses LEDs for the backlighting, rather than cold cathode fluorescent tubes. The benefit: more even illumination. And it uses In Plane Switching (IPS) display technology, which means you get a wide viewing angle with no color shift even when the screen is viewed at an extreme angle. Viewing angle is stated as 178 degree in both the horizontal and vertical planes.
Covering that screen is a glossy glass laminate with an antiglare coating. The antiglare coating is not a matte finish; the screen is glossy, but the antiglare coating reduces the intensity of any glare from reflected light. As with any monitor, you’ll want to position it so that ambient light is not reflected directly back at you. I’ve found the screen easy to use.
The monitor comes with a removable stand and has a 100×100 VESA mounting size for use with desk or wall mounts. The stand (which is completely removable) has rotate and tilt adjustments. It doesn’t have height adjustment, a feature found on a small number of other monitors.
The bezel is black plastic and is relatively thick. The OSD controls (brightness, etc.) are easy to reach. The connectors are in the usual awkward place for monitors, along the bottom bezel.
Several other stats are key. One is dead pixels. The monitor has over 10 million subpixels (2560 x 1440 pixels x 3 colors per pixel). If any one of those subpixels is stuck in the on or off position, you get a dead pixel – a spot that is always dark, or always white, red, reddish, green, greenish, etc. Unfortunately, dead pixels are a potential fact of life on all monitors – but Monoprice tells me they offer a zero dead pixel guarantee for a year. It’s an unusually strong guarantee, since other manufacturers often will only guarantee that the dead pixel count won’t exceed 5 or 10. The unit I received had no dead pixels.
Also important are brightness and contrast. Monoprice advertises a brightness rating of 440 cd/m², which it says is more than 15% brighter than most comparable displays, and a maximum dynamic contrast ratio of 80,000:1.
The display is indeed bright, but this is the one area where I noted a difficulty with this product – the screen is a bit too bright, even with the brightness adjustment turned down to the lowest setting. As a result, black areas on screen are rendered slightly grayish. For most people and most applications, this won’t be a problem – and it’s a phenomenon that’s scarcely unique to the Monoprice unit – but graphic designers will want to carefully compare this screen with others to see what meets their needs.
The panel features 109 pixels per inch, which translates to a 0.2331mm pixel size. The unit also includes builtin stereo speakers, which can be fed via a stereo audio cable, as well as audio from the HDMI connection. As with most builtin monitor speakers, the sound was tinny and unimpressive, so I don’t recommend using them. Buy a pair of standalone computer speakers instead.
Another stat is response time, which the company says is 6 milliseconds (gray-to-gray response time). That’s a measurement of how long it takes the monitor to change the image when the PC tells it to, and is an issue for almost no one except gamers.
Bottom line: if you’re looking for a high-quality 27″ WQHD IPS LED monitor at a great price, pick up the Monoprice 10489.

Present Mozilla Firefox Beta 23

Jakarta (ANTARA News) – Following the release of Firefox 22 two days ago, Mozilla announced the Firefox Beta update, with version 23, on the desktop and Android.

As reported by TheNextWeb, Wednesday, Firefox Beta 23 is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. The biggest addition is the function of sharing new Mozilla.

Firefox beta has a new Share button and the panel for the application programming interfaces (Application Program Interface / API) social. In other words, developers can let users share content with friends with one click (Facebook users, for instance, can use it to share content directly from Firefox).

In addition, Firefox Social API now open to all developers who are interested in integrating their services to the website or the Mozilla browser.

This feature was first comes back in Firefox 17 in November 2012, is integrated with Facebook in December 2012, and then expanded to support providers with Firefox 21 in May this year.

In short, social API lets you keep up with the latest social events without having to switch to a new tab. Mozilla developed the “activation of social services and providers that integrate directly into Firefox where users can search for content or websites in person”. So now any developer can participate.

Next up is a mixture of content blocker, prevents (HTTP) malicious content on the site is being read or modified by an attacker with blocking. Content mixture occurs when a web page containing a combination of content secure (HTTPS) and non-secure (HTTP) which is transmitted through a secure data channel to the browser.

Finally, developers can use the new network monitor. Monitor new tissue damage components of individual sites, highlighting how long it takes each of the sites to load.

Try Browser, Can Direct Voucher Rp 50,000!

Although less popular among netizens, the browser application (browser) Internet Explorer apparently still prevail as the most widely used browser.

Based on the results of research from Net Applications, between December 2012 and January 2013, the number of Internet Explorer users scored 55.14 percent in January.

While Firefox and Google Chrome remained in a two and three, which stood at 19.94 per cent and 17.48 per cent.

In detail, IE10 get 1.29 percent of the market, while IE9 was 20.93 percent and IE 8 is still the best value for Microsoft with 23.54 percent.

Although the youngest position, IE10 recently earned the most secure browser (Read: Adu Safe, IE10 Defeat Firefox and Chrome).

However, it is not know it was love? Therefore, Microsoft Indonesia Kompas.com invites readers to try out the most secure browser.

Not only could give it a try, you will also receive a voucher directly from the online shopping site Lazada of Rp 50,000 (these terms and conditions) as soon as you download this browser.

How easy really. You live register and download IE10 on the following link, and also provide a unique commentary. The three most interesting comments will get a voucher worth Rp 200,000.