Category Archives: Computer Technology

7 Months, Google Clear 100 Million Pirated Content

CALIFORNIA – July is almost over and Google has removed more than 100 million web pages containing links content copyright infringement. The removal of the copyright holder hope these links can keep consumers from pirated content sites.

Reported by Softpedia, Friday (27/07/2013), according to TorrentFreak reports, the number of links that have been removed by Google starting this year more than in 2012. Meanwhile, Google decided to be transparent about all removal requests pirated content in search results.

Since January this year, Google has been asked to remove more than 105.3 million web pages that allegedly contain pirated content. A number of sites that claimed to contain pirated contents has also been reported.

Search engine files, FilesTube, is the most hunted with more than 5.8 million links, and Rapidgator.net Torrentz.eu followed, with each more than 2 million links.

Meanwhile, The Pirate Bay, which had become the hunted, now is not in the list of top 20. This is because the torrent sites are changing domains and only has two million links.

Adobe completes $600M purchase of Neolane

Calif. (AP) — Adobe Systems Inc. said Tuesday that it has closed on a $600 million purchase of Neolane, a French company that provides technology for marketing campaigns.

Adobe, which makes Photoshop and other creative software and is shifting its business to a subscription model, said that Neolane would bolster its digital-marketing services.

The San Jose, Calif., company already has digital marketing services, including analytics and targeting. Neolane’s technology, meanwhile, helps companies manage marketing campaigns on the Internet, email, social media and mobile devices, as well as through call centers and direct mail. It has more than 400 customers around the world, many of whom also used Adobe services.

When it announced its plans for the deal last month, Adobe said buying Neolane would not significantly affect its results this year. The company couldn’t estimate the effect of the acquisition on future earnings.

Adobe’s stock closed Monday at $48.28, up 28 percent this year.

Why designed a front-end programming language from scratch

Today’s programming languages have traditionally been created by the tech giants. These languages are made up of millions of lines of code, so the tech giants only invest in incremental, non-breaking changes that address their business concerns. This is why innovation in popular languages like C, Java, and JavaScript is depressingly slow.

Open-source languages like Python and Ruby gained widespread industrial use by solving backend problems at startup scale. Without the constraints of legacy code and committee politics, language designers are free to explore meaningful language innovation. And with compile-to-VM languages, it has become cheap enough for individuals and startups to create the future of programming languages themselves.

Open-source language innovation has not yet disrupted front-end programming. We still use the same object-oriented model that took over the industry in the 1980s. The tech giants are heavily committed to this approach, but open-source has made it possible to pursue drastically different methods.

Two years ago, I began to rethink front-end programming from scratch. I quickly found myself refining a then-obscure academic idea called Functional Reactive Programming. This developed into Elm, a language that compiles to JavaScript and makes it much easier to create highly interactive programs.

Since the advent of Elm, a lively and friendly community has sprung up, made up of everyone from professional developers to academics to beginners who have never tried functional programming before. This diversity of voices and experiences has been a huge help in guiding Elm towards viability as a production-ready language.

The community has already created a bunch of high quality contributions that are shaping the future of Elm and are aiming to shape the future of front-end programming.

Dev tools

Early on, I made it a priority to let people write, compile, and use Elm programs directly from their browser. No install, no downloads. This interactive editor made it easy for beginners and experts alike to learn Elm and start using it immediately.

In-browser compilation triggered lots of discussion, ideas, and ultimately contributions. Mads Flensted-Urech added in-line documentation for all standard libraries. Put your cursor over a function, and you get the type, prose explanation, and link to the library it comes from. Laszlo Pandy took charge of debugging tools. He is focusing on visualizing the state of an Elm program as time passes, even going so far as pausing, rewinding, and replaying events.

Runtime

I designed Elm to work nicely with concurrency. Unfortunately, JavaScript’s concurrency support is quite poor with questionable prospects for improvement. I decided to save the apparent implementation quagmire for later, but John P. Mayer decided to make it happen. He now has a version of the runtime that can automatically multiplex tasks across many threads, all implemented in JavaScript.

Common to all of these cases are driven individuals who knew they could do it better. This is how Elm got started and how it caught the attention of Prezi, a company also not content to accept JavaScript as the one and only answer for front-end development. I have since joined the company for the express purpose of furthering work on Elm.

We do not need to sit and hope that the tech giants will someday do an okay job. We can create the future of front-end programming ourselves, and we can do it now.

 

Laser App Software Announces Core Initiatives for 2013 Broker-Dealer Conference

Laser App Software, the leading provider of forms automation and management software for the securities and insurance industries, today announced the key initiatives planned for the 2013 Broker-Dealer Conference. The conference will take place from August 21 through August 23 and will be held at the San Diego Marriott Marquis & Marina. The conference brings 300 broker-dealer executives and software providers into a collaborative environment to focus on technology trends and integrations.

Laser App has geared the 2013 conference around the optimization of working in a mobile practice. This is in response to the overwhelming industry push toward mobility. Everything from the “Advisor adoption of technology” presentation by author and industry expert Joel Bruckenstein, to demonstrations on integrations with the major custodians, to the e-sign acceptance presentation, and the recently produced software integrations with our partners are all geared toward broker-dealers supporting their reps in a mobile environment.

At last year’s event, Laser App released the Anywhere Platform its pure HTML mobile solution. This year, Laser App is unveiling a myriad of enhancements and integrations to the platform designed to meet the needs of both broker-dealers and advisors.

As always, there will be a blend of work and play. The evening event will be a casino cruise around the San Diego harbor where attendees will be treated to dinner, drinks, and their favorite table games. The Thursday lunchtime keynote speaker is Reggie Brown, a comedian and impressionist, known for his impersonation of President Barack Obama.

“Over the last 7 years, the Laser App conference has evolved from a user group meeting to a place where hundreds of broker-dealers come to learn and interact with each other and solution providers. I want every broker-dealer to leave the conference knowing where they’re headed and which solution providers can solve their problems, and I want them to enjoy themselves,” said Robert Powell, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Laser App Software.

“The Laser App Conference has been incredibly useful for broker-dealers to learn more about technology advancements in the financial services industry. The conference is consistently high-energy and covers important topics such as straight-through-processing, integration, and mobile business processing. We look forward to the conference every year as a way to learn more about where we can improve our operations, and how technology can benefit our practice,” said Chris Shaw of ProEquities.

About Laser App Software
Laser App Software is the premier e-forms provider in the financial services industry. Laser app creates highly integrated solutions that combine state‐of‐the‐art forms-filling technology with its massive library of industry related forms.

Asus launches Windows 8-based Transformer Book TX300 at Rs 91,999

New Delhi: Asus announced the launch of the Transformer Book TX300 in India at Rs 91,999. The company claims it to be the world’s thinnest Window 8 tablet and detachable notebook.

The Asus Transformer Book is a 13.3-inch notebook with a detachable tablet which has a Full HD IPS touch panel and a 178 degree viewing angle. It comes with an Intel Core i5 processor. The Asus Transformer Book is available with Windows 8 Professional.

It can either be used as a Windows 8 multi-touch tablet or a notebook with keyboard and touchpad. It comes with two types of internal storage device. “As a tablet, the 128GB SSD means apps launch instantly for a slick and seamless Windows 8 experience, while ASUS WebStorage ensures easy access to secure cloud storage when travelling far and wide. Connect Asus Transformer Book to its notebook dock and it instantly becomes a fully functional notebook with up to a 500GB hard drive,” said the company.

In Notebook Mode, the Asus Transformer Book features a backlit keyboard with ambient light control that automatically adjusts its brightness to suit the surroundings. it has up to five hours of battery life in full notebook mode and up to eight hours in tablet mode. It has a front 720p HD and a rear 5-megapixel camera.

The Asus Transformer Book will be available in India across select Asus authorised retail outlets starting second week of July 2013.

HP EliteBook Revolve 810, “Tablet-Laptop” for Businessman

Hewlett-Packard (HP) launched a convertible, a device that combines the concept of tablet and notebook in one package, called the HP EliteBook latest Revolve 810, Wednesday (24/07/2013).

Different from most of the convertibles that are circulating in the market these days, HP is targeting sales of products for businesses.

According to Cynthia Defjan, MDM Business Notebook HP Indonesia, EliteBook Revolve 810 comes as a device for business people who are armed with a variety of features that can not be found in consumer grade devices.

For example, a joint product between tablet and notebook is equipped with a safety feature called HP Client Security. Using these features, users can protect the devices at every layer, including hardware, software, and BIOS.

In addition, security is also installed Microsoft Defender or Microsoft Security Essentials and also the certified TPM security chip for data encryption.

“This device is targeted to enterprise-class. We make a difference in terms of manageability and security,” said Cynthia in Jakarta.

Another added value, HP also designed the device for resilient or resistant to impact. One way is to use artificial Corning Gorilla Glass screen. By using this screen, the device anti-scratch and impact.

Together with the convertible devices in general, the display of the EliteBook Revolve 810 can be rotated up to 360 degrees. To go into tablet mode, the screen rotated and folded enough.

“This is a business tablet that can be converted into a device with notebook performance. It is a tablet that comes with a keyboard,” said Defjan.

Because these devices into the enterprise, there is no standard specification defined by HP. Those who are interested can modify or order in accordance with the wishes of each.

The screen spans 11.6 inches with a brightness level of 400 nits. Available processors ranging from Intel Core Sandy Bridge generation of three to four generations of Haswell.

For the storage media, this product has up to 256 GB SSD option. He is also equipped with a camera, backlit keyboard, and NFC chip.

Operating system supplied is Windows 8. However, for companies that are not yet ready to switch to the operating system, HP provides the operating system Windows 7.

HP EliteBook Revolve 810 already ordered directly through HP. Cheapest price of this device is approximately USD 17 million.

Ultrabook Not Be Superhero?

Intel aggressively promote thin laptop “Ultrabook” which recently has begun equipped with a touch screen. Products “2-in-1 ‘was introduced, with various forms of” magic “that can be changed from laptop to tablet and vice versa.

But all of that as not enough to subvert the glory of Apple’s MacBook Air as the pioneer and the most sought after consumer thin laptops, at least for the U.S. market.

In Uncle Sam’s, as revealed by research agency NPD report cited by Cnet, controlled 56 percent of the MacBook Air slim laptop sales during the first five months of 2013.

The remaining 44 percent is divided between partners-manufacturers Intel Ultrabook.

The latest generation MacBook Air (model 2013) also received positive feedback thanks to the durability of the battery reaches a dozen hours and expected to help maintain the market dominance of these devices in a thin laptop.

It should be noted that the battery life of the MacBook Air in 2013 made ​​possible by the Core 4th Generation of Intel. Thus, the processor manufacturers also benefit from the success of the MacBook Air.

But stronghold Windows laptop was not keep silent. In last week’s Build conference, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said that the hybrid device (2-in-1) with touch screen feature will eliminate the need to carry laptops and tablets separately.

On the other hand, Apple considers that the touchscreen is more suitable to be applied to the iPad than a laptop. Most consumers seem to agree.

5 Coding Hacks to Reduce GC Overhead

In this post we’ll look at five ways in roomates efficient coding we can use to help our garbage collector CPU spend less time allocating and freeing memory, and reduce GC overhead. Often Long GCs can lead to our code being stopped while memory is reclaimed (AKA “stop the world”). Duke_GCPost

Some background

The GC is built to handle large amounts of allocations of short-lived objects (think of something like rendering a web page, where most of the objects allocated Become obsolete once the page is served).

The GC does this using what’s called a “young generation” – a heap segment where new objects are allocated. Each object has an “age” (placed in the object’s header bits) defines how many roomates collections it has “survived” without being reclaimed. Once a certain age is reached, the object is copied into another section in the heap called a “survivor” or “old” generation.

The process, while efficient, still comes at a cost. Being Able to reduce the number of temporary allocations can really help us increase of throughput, especially in high-scale applications.

Below are five ways everyday we can write code that is more memory efficient, without having to spend a lot of time on it, or reducing code readability.

1. Avoid implicit Strings

Strings are an integral part of almost every structure of data we manage. Being much heavier than other primitive values, they have a much stronger impact on memory usage.

One of the most important things to note is that Strings are immutable. They can not be modified after allocation. Operators such as “+” for concatenation actually allocate a new String containing the contents of the strings being joined. What’s worse, is there’s an implicit StringBuilder object that is allocated to actually do the work of combining them.

For example –

1
a = a + b; / / a and b are Strings
The compiler generates code comparable behind the scenes:

1
StringBuilder temp = new StringBuilder (a).
2
temp.append (b);
3
a = temp.toString () / / a new string is allocated here.
4
/ / The previous “a” is now garbage.
But it gets worse.

Let’s look at this example –

1
String result = foo () + arg;
2
result + = boo ();
3
System.out.println (“result =” + result);
In this example we have 3 StringBuilders allocated in the background – one for each plus operation, and two additional Strings – one to hold the result of the second assignment and another to hold the string passed into the print method. That’s 5 additional objects in what would otherwise Appear to be a pretty trivial statement.

Think about what happens in real-world scenarios such as generating code a web page, working with XML or reading text from a file. Within a nested loop structures, you could be looking at Hundreds or Thousands of objects that are implicitly allocated. While the VM has Mechanisms to deal with this, it comes at a cost – one paid by your users.

The solution: One way of reducing this is being proactive with StringBuilder allocations. The example below Achieves the same result as the code above while allocating only one StringBuilder and one string to hold the final result, instead of the original five objects.

1
StringBuilder value = new StringBuilder (“result =”);
2
value.append (foo ()). append (arg). append (boo ());
3
System.out.println (value);
By being mindful of the way Strings are implicitly allocated and StringBuilders you can materially reduce the amount of short-term allocations in high-scale code locations.

2. List Plan capacities

Dynamic collections such as ArrayLists are among the most basic dynamic structures to hold the data length. ArrayLists and other collections such as HashMaps and implemented a Treemaps are using the underlying Object [] arrays. Like Strings (Themselves wrappers over char [] arrays), arrays are also immutable. Becomes The obvious question then – how can we add / put items in their collections if the underlying array’s size is immutable? The answer is obvious as well – by allocating more arrays.

Let’s look at this example –

1
List <Item> <Item> items = new ArrayList ();
2

3
for (int i = 0; i <len; i + +)
4
{
5
Item item = readNextItem ();
6
items.add (item);
7
}
The value of len Determines the ultimate length of items once the loop finishes. This value, however, is unknown to the constructor of the ArrayList roomates allocates a new Object array with a default size. Whenever the internal capacity of the array is exceeded, it’s replaced with a new array of sufficient length, making the previous array of garbage.

If you’re executing the loop Welcome to Thunderbird times you may be forcing a new array to be allocated and a previous one to be collected multiple times. For code running in a high-scale environment, these allocations and deallocations are all deducted from your machine’s CPU cycles.
%0

This is the realization Stud Google, Moto X

Google not only successfully make the Android operating system, but apparently Google is also competing in the smartphone market plunge in collaboration with Motorola. This time I will make sure to introduce smartphone champion, Moto X on 1 August.
Various leak is scattered, including what kind of form. A leaked disseminated @ evleaks, the usual Twitter account posted the leaked gadget show looks Moto X.
Reporting from VentureBeat, Moto X design looks interesting, where the device has a 4.5 inch screen, while the kitchen spur MSM8960T of embedded processor Qualcomm Snapdragon dual core with 1.7 GHz technology. The RAM capacity of 2 GB.
As for the power of the battery, Moto X is said to rely on the battery capacity of 1500 mAh, which is powered by a battery cover with Kevlar material which is safe on the back. While Android 4.2.2 Jelly bean in trust Google and Motorola as its OS.
Plus always on listening features allow users to do voice commands without having to touch the Moto X. To run this feature, the user must activate the pass setting. Like Siri – that should say Hi Siri password first, the first command to be spoken is Ok Google Now, however, without having to press any buttons.

Hacking with a Hacker

What is it like to hack with one of the original hackers? It is certainly much different than what Appears to be the modern rendition of hacking. My experience was not getting really drunk with tons of junk food. It was not working on “beautiful” designs or “authentic” typography. It was not so much about sharing with the world as it was sharing with your peers. It had a very different feel to it than the “hacker culture” Promoted by some of the top technical Silicon Valley companies. It felt more “at home”, less dreamy, and more memorable.

I meet with Bill Gosper every so Often; I had the pleasure of giving him a tour of Facebook when I worked there. (He was so surprised that they had Coke in the glass bottles there, just like the old days.)

He is still very much a hacker, a thinker, a tinkerer, and a wonderer. Every time I meet up with him, he has a new puzzle for me, or someone around him, to solve, whether it’s really clever compass constructions, circle packing, block building, Game of Life automata solving, or even something more tangible like a Buttonhole homemade trap (which was affixed to my shirt for no less than two weeks!). He is also the bearer of interesting items, such as a belt buckle he gave me roomates depicts, in aluminum, a particular circle loose packing.
Gosper succeeding in tricking me with the Buttonhole Trap
When we meet up, all we do is hack. Along with him and one of his talented young students, we all work on something. Anything interesting, really. Last time we met up, we resurrected an old Lisp machine and did some software archeology. I brought over some of the manuals I own, like the great Chinual, and he brought over a dusty old 1U rackmount Alpha machine with OpenGenera installed. After passing a combination of Hurdles, such as that the keyboard was not interfacing with the computer Correctly, we finally got it to boot up. Now, I got to see with my own eyes, a time capsule containing a lot of Bill’s work from the 70s, 80s, and 90s, roomates could only be commanded and Examined through Zmacs dired and Symbolics Common Lisp. Our next goal was to get Symbolics Macsyma fired up on the old machine.

There was trouble with starting it up. License issues were one problem, finding and loading all of the files were compiled another. Running applications on a Lisp machine is very different than what we do today on modern machines, Windows or UNIX. There’s no. Exe file to click, or. App bundle to start up, or even a single. / File to execute. Usually it’s a collection of compiled “fast loading” or “fasl” files that get loaded side-by-side with the operating system. The application, in essence, Becomes a part of the OS.

In hacker tradition, we were Able to bypass the license issues by modifying the binary directly in Lisp. Fortunately, such as Lisp makes things easy disassembly. But how do we load the damn thing? Bill frustratingly muttered, “It’s been at least 20 years since I’ve done it. I just do not remember. “I, being an owner of MacIvory Symbolics Lisp machines, fortunately did remember how to load programs. “Bill, how about LOAD SYSTEM Macsyma?” He typed it into the native Lisp “Listener 2” window (we kept “Listener 1” for debugging), sometimes making a few typing mistakes, but finally succeeding, and then we saw the stream of files loading. We all Shouted in joy that progress was being made. I recall Bill was especially astounded at how fast everything was loading. This was on a fast Alpha machine with gobs of memory. It must have been much slower on the old 3600s they used back in the day.
The Lisp Machine Manual, or Chinual
It was all done after a few minutes, and Macsyma was loaded. To me, this was a sort of holy grail. I personally have Macsyma for Windows (which he uses in a VirtualBox machine on his 17 “MacBook), and I’ve definitely used Maxima. But Macsyma is something I’ve never seen. It was something that seems to have disappeared with history, something I have not been Able to find a copy of in the last decade.

Bill said, “let’s see if it works.” And he typed 1 +1; in, and sure enough, the result was 2. He saw I was bubbling with excitement and asked me if I’d like to try anything. “I’d love to,” and he handed the keyboard over to me and I typed in my canonical computer algebra test: integrate (sqrt (tan (x)), x);, roomates computes the indefinite integral
—- √ ∫ tanθ dθ
Out came the four-term typeset result of logarithms and arctangents, plus a fifth term I’d never seen before. “I’ve never seen any computer algebra system add that fifth term,” I said, “but it does not look incorrect.” The fifth term was a floored expression, Whose Increased value with the period of the function preceding it. “Let’s plot it,” Bill said. He plotted it using Macsyma’s menu interface, and it was what appeared to be an increasing, non-periodic function. I think we determined it was properly handled Because Macsyma branch cuts, with other systems have been known to be unorthodox about. It definitely had a pragmatic feel to it.

Now, Bill wanted to show us some interesting things; however all of Bill’s recent work Macsyma was on his laptop. How do we connect this ancient to a modern Macintosh hardware? We needed to get the machine onto the network, and networking with old machines is not my forte.

Fortunately, Stephen Jones, a friend of Bill’s and seemingly an expert at a rare combination of technical tasks, showed up. He Was able to do things that Neither Bill nor I could do on such an old machine. In only a few moments, he Was able to get Bill’s Mac talking to the Alpha, roomates shared a portion of its file system with Genera. “Will there be enough space on the Alpha for Macsyma my files?” Bill asked Stephen. “Of course, there’s ton’s of space.” We finally got Bill’s recent work transferred onto the machine.
Bill hacking in Macsyma in OpenGenera (Image courtesy of Stephen M. Jones)
We spent the rest of the night hacking on math. He Demonstrated to us what it was like to do a real mathematician’s work at the machine. He debuted some of his recent work. He went though a long chain of reasoning, showing us the line-after-line in Macsyma, number theoretic amazing to do things I’ve never seen before.

I did ask Bill why he does not publish more often. His previous publications have been landmarks: his algorithm for hypergeometric series and his summation algorithm for playing the Game of Life at light speed. He RESPONDED, “when there’s something interesting to publish, it’ll be published.” He seemed to have a sort of disdain for “salami science”, where scientific and mathematical papers present the thinnest possible “slice” or result possible.

Bill is certainly a man that thinks in a different way than most of us do. He is still hacking at mathematics, and still as impressive as before. I’m very fortunate to have met him, and I was absolutely delighted to see that even at 70 years old, his mind is still as sharp as can be, and it’s still being used to do interesting, Gosper-like mathematics.

And you would not believe it. We all were ready to head home at around 9 PM.